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Best of July

Best of July

I’ve been reading a lot this summer, and so far my top picks for July are the following:

    Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn– Soon to be made into a movie, this thriller is full of plot twists and loads of suspense. The story is about Amy Dunn, who mysteriously goes missing from her house one summer day. Her husband, Nick, looks increasing suspicious as the investigation proceeds… but could he really have killed his wife?
    The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty– This story is about a mother of three, Cecilia, and her seemingly perfect life, complete with her perfect husband… or so she thought. One day while Cecilia’s husband is out of town, she finds a letter addressed to her from her husband that is only to be opened upon his death, as it holds a life-changing secret. Curiosity gets the best of Cecilia, and after reading the letter her family’s life is forever changed… This is one of the best “chick-lit” books I’ve ever read. It has more suspense and is more thought-provoking than your average “chick-lit” read. Definitely recommend it, as I read the whole book in one day!
    OCD Love Story by Corey Ann Haydu– This YA book is about Bea, a high school student who struggles with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. She soon falls for Beck, a boy in group therapy and finally she finds her match- someone who understands her quirks and can relate to her situation. It’s a cute, high school love story; however, it’s also raw and emotional, as it’s a very real depiction of living with a serious mental illness.
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The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars

It seems as though every second teen is requesting The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. When books are requested that often I have to read them, regardless of the topic, to see what all the fuss is about.

Amazon.com Review:

In The Fault in Our Stars, John Green has created a soulful novel that tackles big subjects–life, death, love–with the perfect blend of levity and heart-swelling emotion. Hazel is sixteen, with terminal cancer, when she meets Augustus at her kids-with-cancer support group. The two are kindred spirits, sharing an irreverent sense of humor and immense charm, and watching them fall in love even as they face universal questions of the human condition–How will I be remembered? Does my life, and will my death, have meaning?–has a raw honesty that is deeply moving. –Seira Wilson

Accolades for The Fault in Our Stars:

TIME Magazine’s #1 Fiction Book of 2012
An Entertainment Weekly Best Fiction Book of 2012
John Green is one of Entertainment Weekly’s Entertainers of the Year, 2012
#1 New York Times Bestseller
#1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller
A USA Today Bestseller
International Bestseller
#1 Children’s Indiebound Pick
New York Times Editor’s Choice
The Huffington Post Best Books of 2012
A Booklist Books for Youth Editor’s Choice
The Horn Book Fanfare List
A Publishers Weekly Best Book
A School Library Journal Best Book
Unprecedented EIGHT starred reviews

My review: I read half the book in one sitting, which obviously is a sign of a gripping book. It started off very strong, making you quickly grow close to main characters. It’s LOL funny at times, moving, and none too “teen angsty,” as many YA books. However, I felt like it fizzled toward the end. I wasn’t expecting a happily ever after type ending, but the so called turn in the story was predictable, and I was left a bit disappointed. Maybe I expected too much? It’s overall a good book, but not one that will stick with me, nor plague with me questions of what happened to the main character after the book ended, as it did to Hazel in An Imperial Affliction. *Spoiler Alert!* Okay, I take that back, I am starting to wonder how Hazel is doing…

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