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Author: librariange

Colours Storytime

Colours Storytime

Many Colored DaysI used this for a daycare visit and StrongStart, so it’s a bit shorter than the standard 30 minute storytime.

Opening: Bread and Butter, Marmalade and Jam, Let’s say hello as FAST as we can…
… SLOW… QUIET… LOUD

Book: My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss

Flannel:  Red Fish, Red Fish, What Do You See? (Modified “Brown bear, brown bear.” I used fish flannels but you could use any coloured item.)

Song: Driving round in my little red car, driving round in little red car, driving round in my little red car, zoom zoom zoom zoom zoom.
(Then ask the kids to choose another colour car and keep going with the colours they choose.)

Book: Where is the Green Sheep? By Mem Fox

Action Rhyme/Game: Green means go- go, go, go! Yellow means slow, slow, slow, slow. Red means stop- stop.
(I use a big piece of green, yellow, and red flannel to hold up as I say each part of the rhyme. I also tell the kids they can stand up if they want and run on spot, and freeze on red. I run through it 2 or 3 times.)

Book: Duckie’s Rainbow by Frances Barry

Song: If you’re wearing red today touch your head, if you’re wearing red today, touch your head. If you’re wearing red today, if you’re wearing red today, if you’re wearing red today, touch your head.
… blue touch your shoe… yellow clap your hands… green stomp your feet

Closing Song: We wave goodbye like this, we wave goodbye like this. We clap our hands for all our friends, we wave goodbye like this.

Winter Strong Start

Winter Strong Start

Welcome Song:
I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap. I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, and I wiggle my  waggles away.
… nose with a beep, beep, beep
… eyes with a blink, blink, blink
… tummy with a rub, rub, rubSnowballs

Rhyme: Open and Shut Them, open and shut them give a little clap, clap, clap, open and shut them, open and shut them, put them in your lap, lap, lap. Creep them, creep them, creep them, creep them right up to your chin, chin, chin. Open up your little mouth but do not let them in!

Book: Snowballs by Lois Ehlert

Song: Snowflakes are falling down, falling down, falling down.
Snowflakes are falling down, I love winter.
Build a snowman tall and round, tall and round, tall and round,
Build a snowman tall and round, I love winter.

Snowman Flannel (let kids add the pieces)
I made a friendly snowman, I made him big and round.
I made him from a snowball, I rolled upon the ground.
He has two eyes, a nose, a mouth, a lovely scarf of red.
He even has some buttons,  and a hat upon his head.

Song: Snowy Pokey
You put your right mitten in, you take your right mitten out. You put your right mitten and you shake it all about.
You do the Snowy Pokey (shiver), and you warm yourself up.
That’s what it’s all about.
left mitten…
right boot…

Book w/bells: Jingle, Jingle by Nicola Smee

Song w/bells:
Bells are ringing, bells are ringing.  Ding, ding, dong, ding, ding, dong.
Happy little bells, happy little bells. All day long, ring their song!

Book: The Itsy Bitsy Snowman by Jeffrey Burton

Closing Song:
We wave goodbye like this, we wave goodbye like this. We clap our hands for all our friends, we wave goodbye like this.

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Animal Strong Start

Animal Strong Start

This month’s Strong Start is going to be an animal theme:

Welcome Songs:
I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap.
I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, and I wiggle my waggles away.
… nose with a beep, beep, beep
… eyes with a blink, blink, blink
… tummy with a rub, rub, rub
… feet with a stomp, stomp, stomp

Open and Shut Them, open and shut them give a little clap, clap, clap, open and shut them, open and shut them, put them in your lap, lap, lap. Creep them, creep them, creep them, creep them right up to your chin, chin, chin. Open up your little mouth but do not let them in!

Book: Jump by Scott M. Fischer

Action Rhyme: Can you hop like a rabbit?
Can you jump like a frog?
Can you waddle like a duck?
Can you wag your tail like a dog?
Can you fly like a bird?
Can you swim like a fish?
Can you sit back down and be still like this?

Flannel: Five Little Fish
Five little fish swimming by the shore,
Once got caught and then there were four.
Four little fish swimming in the sea,
One got caught and then there were three.
Three little fish swimming in the blue,
One got caught and then there were two.
Two little fish swimming in the sun,
One got caught and then there was one.
One little fish swimming for home,
Decided it was best to never roam.

Song: The waves in the sea go up and down…
The fish in the sea, go swim, swim swim…
The lobsters in the sea go pinch, pinch, pinch…
The sharks in the sea go chomp, chomp, chomp…

Book: I Spy Pets by Edward Gibbs

Action Rhyme w/monkey puppet:
Monkey, monkey in the tree, can you______ like me?
(jump around, swing your tail, scratch an itch, eat a banana, take a nap)

Song:
If you’re a lion and you know it say roar…
… cat say meow
… pig say oink
… dog say woof

Book: A Dog is a Dog by Stephen Shaskan

Closing Song: We wave goodbye like this, we wave goodbye like this. We clap our hands for all our friends, we wave goodbye like this.

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Halloween Strong Start

Halloween Strong Start

I have yet to do a Strong Start, so this will be my first attempt, Halloween style. I have been told to use “lots of songs, puppets, and felts” and aim for around 15 minutes. Here’s the plan:

Welcome Song:
I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap, a clap, clap, clap.
I wake up my hands with a clap, clap, clap, and I wiggle my waggles away.
… nose with a beep, beep, beep
… head with a tap, tap, tap
… tummy with a rub, rub, rub

Book: Plumply, Dumply Pumpkin

Action rhyme: “Little Owls, Little Owls” with owl puppet
 Little owls, little owls, jump up and down.
Little owls, little owls, turn around.
Little owls, little owls, tip-toe to me.
Little owls, little owls, look around and see
Little owls, little owls, flap, flap, flap.
Little owls, little owls, take a nap.
Little owls, little owls, fly to the leaves!
Little owls, little owls, sit down, please.

Book: Jungle Halloween

Song: “If You’re a Monster and You Know It”
If you’re a monster and you know it stomp your paws.
If you’re a monster and you know it stomp your paws.
If you’re a monster and you know it and you really want to show it, if you’re a monster and you know it stomp your paws.
… twitch your tail
… give a roar
… smack your claws

Bat Flannel
Red bat, red bat what do you see?

Bat Song
Bats are sleeping, bats are sleeping.
Upside down, upside down.
Waiting for the night to come, waiting for the night to come.
They fly around, they fly around.

Book: 10 Trick or Treaters: A Halloween Counting Book

Closing Song:
We wave goodbye like this, we wave goodbye like this.
We clap our hands for all our friends, we wave goodbye like this.

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Babytime Take Two

Babytime Take Two

I learned from my last babytime that:

  1. It’s better to do more songs before the shaker/scarf songs, while the babies/toddlers’ attention spans are still intact, and leave the attention getting songs toward the end.
  2. It’s better to do more “easy” songs that parents are familiar with, as opposed to trying to be too creative and add too many new songs each week. Parents are usually busy trying to wrangle their babies; I don’t think they don’t want to have to focus too hard on learning new songs.
  3. My song board was plain boring. I added fish flannels and an octopus puppet to liven it up.

So I changed my plan a bit for tomorrow’s babytime and hopefully it will go swimmingly (pun intended).

Come Along and Sing With Me
The More We Get Together
Open and Shut Them
Acka Backa Soda Cracker
This is Big, Big, Big…

Book: Moo, Baa, La La La

Flannel: “Brown Bear, Brown Bear” with fish flannels, “Red fish, red fish…”

Pudding on the Plate
Where has my Little Dog Gone? (with dog puppet)
How Much is that Doggie in the Window? (with dog puppet)

Rattle/Shaker Songs:
Shake and Shake and Shake and Stop
If You’re Happy and Your Know it Give a Shake
Pop, Pop, Pop
1, 2, Shake it on Your Shoe
Tap, Tap, Tap Your Hand with Your Shaker Today

Scarf Songs:
One Bright Scarf
Peek a Boo Baby, Look and See
Popcorn Kernels
Peek a Boo, Peek a Boo, I See You

Zoom, Zoom, Zoom
One Little… Toesies
Cuckoo Clock
Elevator Song
A Bouncing We Will Go

Book: Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear by Steve Scott

Bell Horses (with bells)
Are You Sleeping? (with bells)
The Waves in the Sea (with fish puppet)
We Wave Goodbye Like This

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This Week’s BabyTime

This Week’s BabyTime

Come Along and Sing With Me
Where is Baby, Where is Baby
Acka Backa Soda Cracker
This Is Big, Big, Big

Book: Who Can Swim? by Sebastien Braun

Rattle/Shaker Songs:
If You’re Happy and Your Know it Give a Shake
Shake and Shake and Shake and Stop
Pop, Pop, Pop
1, 2, Shake it on Your Shoe
Tap, Tap, Tap Your Hand with Your Shaker Today

Scarf Songs:
One Bright Scarf
Peek a Boo Baby, Look and See
Popcorn Kernels
Peek a Boo, Peek a Boo, I See You

Zoom, Zoom, Zoom
A Bouncing We Will Go
Here We Go Up, Up, Up
Bell Horses (with bells)
Are You Sleeping? (with bells)

Book: Kiss, Kiss Pout-Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen

Elevator Song
Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock
One Little… Toesies
Row, Row, Row Your Boat (with crocodile puppet)
Goodbye Song (with crocodile puppet)

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Disrupt and Transform

Disrupt and Transform

This year the BC Library Conference’s theme was disrupt and transform.  I attended two days of the conference and took away a lot from the experience. My three favourite sessions were:

  • Under the Hood: Honest Stories about Disruptive Change in a Public Library
    The North Vancouver District Public Library is in the midst of wholesale organizational change. Hear what happens when, over a two year period, the world of a traditional public library is rocked by: a mandate for bold innovative change, new leadership, a new organizational structure, and an intentional approach to nurturing a culture of learning and compassion. We believe every person in the organization is an active and necessary agent of change. This staff-centered approach has begun to transform the way we work together, and in turn, the way we work with our community. Using a lively “lightning round” format, nine speakers will share stories about what they’ve learned (so far).
    This session was filled with great advice from a library director who made it a top priority to improve the library’s work culture/morale, and achieved this by engaging the previously “dismissed” Circ staff in more decision making/reference work etc.; collaborating on a website re-design project and playing on staff strengths, and helping staff through the transition process. Applying William Bridges Transition Model is invaluable in helping staff through the process of change.
  • What’s Really Going on When it Looks like We Are Just Singing?
    Join this panel of passionate and engaged children’s librarians as we shed some light on what is really going on while it looks like we are “just” singing songs and playing with puppets. *Spoiler Alert* it includes brain development, relationship building, empowering parents, improving EDI results, building life-long learners, and making libraries essential and welcoming community destinations, not to mention convincing board members that libraries are still worth the investment. And yes, we are also playing and having some fun!
    I learned a great deal from this session, mainly because I didn’t take any children services courses in grad school. I didn’t have the framework for creating an effective children’s program until I attended this session, so thank you to the presenters!
  • Help – I Want to be Open!
    Open Textbooks, Open Education, Open Access, Open Pedagogy, Open Data, Open Research – Open is a hot topic in Universities currently. But how can librarians participate in the movement? Or better yet, how can they drive it? Find out what is happening at trendsetting institutions and their libraries within the Open movement – locally and internationally. Librarians often get mentioned in the same breath as the open education movement, yet some might not know where they actually fit in. Learn some quick methods you can start using almost immediately after the session. Come away with open strategies that you can use to kick start the movement at your institution, or to enhance the open movement that is already growing in your workplace!
    At first I thought that I didn’t get much from this session because it was geared toward academic librarians and focused heavily on open textbooks- something I never deal with in my job at a public library. However, it rekindled my interest in open access, specifically open education. I rediscovered Alison.com and Coursera.org, and as a result I have started a diploma in human anatomy and physiology; next will be a course in systematic reviews and meta-analysis from Johns Hopkins University. #LifeLongLearning

Check out my notes here: BCLC2016

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Get Loud!

Get Loud!

This week officially begins Mental Health Week #GETLOUD.

Mental Health Week is an annual national event that takes place during the first week in May to encourage people from all walks of life to learn, talk, reflect and engage with others on all issues relating to mental health (CMHA.ca).

To celebrate the week, I planned a program at my library called The Way to Self-Compassion:

In celebration of Mental Health Week, the George Mackie Library presents a workshop on how we can cultivate compassion for ourselves. If you have ever felt you were inadequate or a failure, you are not alone. These feelings can lead to depression, anxiety and self-loathing. Join presenter Caer Weber as she explains how our thinking is faulty in these modern times, and how it leads to so much pain for all of us. Discover how we can liberate ourselves from some of our pain.

I also created a list on Bibliocommons of young adult and adult books related to mental health issues: Mental Health Awareness.

Is your library doing anything for Mental Health Week?

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New Fishy Storytime

New Fishy Storytime

Here’s my new version of a Fishy Storytime, geared towards preschoolers:

Opening: If you’re ready for a story clap your hands. If you’re ready for a story clap your hands. If you’re ready for a story, if you’re ready for a story, if you’re ready for a story clap your hands.
… stomp your feet
… wave hello

Book: Pout Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen

Stretch:
Everybody reach up high
Stretching, stretching to the sky
Swaying left and swaying right
Swimming in the sea at night
Everybody reach up high, stretching, stretching to the sky

Flannel: The Octopus (octopus flannel with 8 flannel boots)
How many boots should an octopus buy?
To keep his feet nice and dry?
Let’s count his feet and then we’ll know–
We can count, let’s go!
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight.
Eight new boots is what he should buy–
That will keep the octopus dry!

Book:  Fidgety Fish by Ruth Galloway

Song: Critters in the Sea (tune: Wheels on the Bus)
The waves in the sea go up and down, up and down… all through the sea
The fish in the sea go swim, swim, swim…
The crabs in the sea go pinch, pinch, pinch…
The octopus in the sea go wiggle, wiggle, wiggle…
The sharks in the sea go chomp, chomp, chomp…
The clams in the sea go open and shut, open and shut, open and shut…

Flannel: Modified “Brown Bear” on flannel board
Red fish red fish what do you see?
I see  blue fish looking at me… Blue fish blue fish what do you see? Etc.
Children, children, what do you see… We see a red fish, blue fish etc. …. looking at us!

Stretch:
Stretch up high
Stretch, stretch, away up high;
On your tiptoes, reach the sky.
See the bluebirds flying high.
Now bend and touch your toes;
Now sway as the North wind blows;
Now waddle as the gander goes!
Now turn around and sit back down!

Book: Hooray for Fish by Lucy Cousins

Action rhyme with octopus puppet: “Octopus, Octopus”
Octopus, octopus, turn around.
Octopus, octopus, touch the ground.
Octopus, octopus, dig in the sand,
Octopus, octopus, shake your neighbors’ hand.
Octopus, octopus, dive for a pearl.
Octopus, octopus, do a twirl.
Octopus, octopus, reach up high.
Octopus, octopus, swimming by.
Octopus, octopus, sway in the sea breeze.
Octopus, octopus, sit down please.

Book: Ten Little Fish by Audrey Wood

Closing Song: I think it’s time, we have to go
Wave your elbows, wave your toes
Wave your tongue, wave your nose
Wave your knees, wave your lips
Blow me a kiss with your fingertips
Wave your chin, wave your eye
Now it’s time to wave goodbye

Fish Stamp for all the kids!

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Peek-a-Boo Baby

Peek-a-Boo Baby

I’m officially the backup for Babytime at my new position. Babytime was always my most feared aspect of librarianship and something I vowed I never to do. I was a 100% adult services librarian! However, after filling in for my coworker a few weeks ago, I realized that Babytime is actually a lot of fun and not nearly as intimidating as I thought. For one, singing in front of a group of 20 or so parents isn’t as daunting as it sounds, since most parents know the words of the songs and sing along with you (I also put up lyric sheets so parents can follow along). Also, a coworker had me look at it from the parents’ point of view- they’re simply grateful to be out of the house and entertained for a half hour! Plus, when you see how excited some of these little ones get when we sing a song they recognize, it’s most satisfying. I don’t think I’ll convert to a children’s librarian but it does add some interaction and variety to my position.

My first attempt at Babytime was somewhat chaotic, as I hadn’t expected the majority of the babies to actually be toddlers, and Toddler Times are definitely planned differently than Babytimes. Now I’ve got a solid plan, so this week should go more smoothly. Here is my outline:

Songs/Rhymes:
Roly Poly
I’m in the mood for singing
Acka, backa soda cracker
This is the way we wash our hands

Shaker Songs:  pass around shakers to each baby
Shake and shake and shake and stop
Shake them up high
Shake it high, shake it low
Tap, tap, tap your hand

Scarf Songs:  exchange shakers for scarves
Jack in the box
Peek-a-boo baby
Peek-a-boo, peek-a-boo
Where is baby

Book: So Many Babies by Lorna Crozier

Songs/Rhymes:
Elevator song
A bouncing we will go
Here we go up, up, up
Bell horses (with bells)
Are you sleeping (with bells)

Book: Ten Tiny Tickles by Karen Katz

Songs/Rhymes:
Zoom, zoom
Tick tock, I’m a little cuckoo clock
One little, two little toesies
Row, row, row your boat (with alligator/crocodile puppet)

Closing Rhyme:
See you later alligator (with alligator/crocodile puppet)

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A New Year Begins

A New Year Begins

Happy New Year, Library Land!

I’m officially working as a Librarian now- no more living in library limbo, working in Circulation and on-call as a librarian. I now have a librarian position mainly doing adult services. The majority of my job consists of planning programs for three branches. I also teach 1-on-1 computer courses, do class visits and run Lego Club, on occasion, as well as the day-to-day collection development, displays, staffing the information desk etc. All in all, I’m busy!

My first “real” planned program will take place this Wednesday- I’m really hoping we have some attendees! Adult programs are not always well-attended in our libraries. It takes a lot for people to head to the library after a long day of work, just to attend a workshop/presentation. It needs to be an interesting enough presentation or provide information that will benefit people enough to make the trip worth while, such a important health or nutritional information. I’m hoping that enough people will take interest in this program. It has been advertised on Facebook, Twitter, around the library on posters and on a book display, as well as the usual press releases. This is my first attempt at programming, as I’m a newbie, so it’s all a learning experience.

From Berlin to Prague: Cruising the Elbe River

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Genre Spotlight: Self-Help

Genre Spotlight: Self-Help

Where to Find Books in the Library:

  • psychology 150s
  • co-dependency 158.2, 362.29, 613.8, 616.86
  • success/healing/change 158.1
  • depression/mental illness 616.8527
  • anxiety 616.85233, 152.46
  • relationships 158.2, 306.7, 362.837
  • memory 153.1, 616.89
  • addiction/recovery 616.8527
  • techniques 158.1, 305.42, 616.85223, 616.8527
  • emotions 152.4, 158.1082
  • grief 155.937
  • dating advice 646.77
  • parenting 649
  • business-type self help 650.1

Well-Known Authors: Dale Carnegie, Robert Atkins, Dalai Lama, Stephen R. Covey, Suze Orman, Anthony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Eckart Tolle, Deepak Chopra, Gail Vaz-Oxlade, Mitch Albom.

Booklists

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Med Lit- Stat!

Med Lit- Stat!

I don’t know if “med lit” is an actual, recognized literary genre but if not, it is now! We have chick lit, so why not med lit to denote medical fiction?

I create a list of fifteen med lit books, which can be found here. I highly recommend Monday Mornings and Trauma.

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Attention MLIS Grads: Free Webinar!

Attention MLIS Grads: Free Webinar!

The Ontario Library Association (OLA) is holding a free webinar on Thurs, August 6 at 2PM EST called “So You’ve Got an MLIS, Now What? What they Forgot to Tell You in Library School.”

Presenters include:
John Dupuis is a science and engineering librarian at York University, Toronto.
Rachel Figueiredo is Waterloo’s Engineering and Entrepreneurship Librarian. I’ve worked in many capacities in the Waterloo Library system (circulation, administrative assistant, co-op, contract librarian, and finally permanent librarian), and have experience volunteering and working in public libraries as well.
Amanda French is the Manager of Mississauga Library System’s Science and Business Department in Central Library.
Klara Maidenberg is the Assessment Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries

For more information and to register, click here, or view all of OLA’s library events.

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The Girl on the Train?

The Girl on the Train?

If you work at a public library, you’re bound to have heard of the latest thriller, The Girl on the Train. In my library system there are currently 285 holds on the 101 copies we have in our collection, ergo, it is an extremely popular book. Apparently, “Gone Girl fans will devour this psychological thriller” (People) and “Nothing is more addicting than The Girl on the Train” (Vanity Fair). Needless to say I had to get my hands on a copy to see what all the fuss was about. I did, in fact, devour and thoroughly enjoy Gone Girl, so I assumed this book would be a hit, as well.

If you’re completely out of the librarian-loop, here is a brief synopsis from Amazon.com:

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

It sounds like a promising, thrilling read; however, I just finished reading it and I am left feeling let down. Am I the only person on the entire planet who was unimpressed by this novel? Perhaps since there was such a build-up I was expecting too much… although Gone Girl lived up to the hype.

I found the beginning of the story to be tedious- you start to wonder if the entire storyline is going to consist of Rachel’s daily commute on the train. I found my mind wandering, which is never a good sign, especially when the book is supposed to be an “electrifying” and “compulsive” read. I also found the character development rather weak. The story starts out alternating between Rachel and another character, Megan, narrating the chapters, and although the chapters are properly labeled with each character’s name, I didn’t even realize at first that there were two different characters. When a third character was added- Anna- I still didn’t see her character differ from the others. Generally when you have several different characters narrating a story, they all have distinct personalities, which makes it easy to distinguish which character is “speaking” at the time. This story was none too clear.

I also would not necessarily consider this a “thriller”- a mystery, yes; I continued reading it because I was curious how the story would end. But a real thriller is like Gone Girl when the story takes that turn in the middle and your mouth drops open, or in Dean Koontz’s Hideaway when you literally jump in your seat. The Girl on the Train paled in comparison. There also was no surprise-ending- nothing shocking or unpredictable happened, and you weren’t left feeling unsettled in the end, as with Gone Girl.

I don’t mean to bash this novel by any means. I’m simply confused as to why this book is flying off the shelves and being “devoured” by so many readers.  Am I completely missing something here? Feel free to enlighten me and help me see this book as more than a weak (and rather annoying) main character, her train rides, and a ho-hum murder mystery.

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